Celebrating Father’s Day

Mardel

I can’t believe that I have flipped the calendar to June, and that this year is flying by at such a quick pace. It seems the older I get, the quicker those days go. As I reflect on what Father’s Day means to me, I want to share that this is the 19th year I have not celebrated with my dad. He passed away in April of 2000. Though that was a difficult time in so many ways, I know that his body was completely healed of the cancer that invaded it. The best part is, I will see him again one day in heaven! I can’t wait! Until then, I have a husband, son, brother, and friends that are fathers. In fact, they are incredible fathers! So, this year I celebrate them …

I really enjoy researching the origins of holidays. I like to find out when they started, the reason behind their observance, the creative mind behind the concept, and how they are traditionally celebrated. Though I have my own thoughts and feelings about each holiday we celebrate, I still enjoy looking into the background.

 

What Father’s Day Celebrates

Father’s Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood, paternal bonds, and the influence of fathers in society. This could encompass not only fathers, but also step-fathers, fathers-in-law, grandfathers, great-grandfathers, and other male relatives and friends. It was not celebrated in the U.S., outside Catholic traditions, until the 20th century. At that time, it was inaugurated to compliment Mother’s Day by also celebrating fathers and male parenting.

 

The Official Holiday

The first observance of any type of “Father’s Day” was held on July 5, 1908 when Grace Golden Clayton was mourning the loss of her father after a mining disaster in West Virginia. She asked her pastor to honor the 361 men who lost their lives and the 1000 children that were left fatherless. The pastor agreed, and that was the first public celebration that honored fatherhood. There were others that attempted to gain public support, but it took a while to catch on. President Calvin Coolidge recognized Father’s Day in 1924, and in 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed an official proclamation of recognition of Father’s Day and made a request that flags be flown on all government buildings that day in honor of fatherhood. Father’s Day wasn’t made a national holiday until 1972, by President Richard Nixon, and it would be celebrated annually on the third Sunday in June. Father’s Day 2019 is on June 16th.

 

Celebration Traditions

Since Father’s Day is a more modern holiday, people all over the world celebrate in various ways. Greeting cards are a must, and a phone call is even better! If you live close and are able to spend the day with your father, then gifts are a great thing. That could include sports items, clothing, electronic gadgets, movie tickets, outdoor cooking supplies, tools, hobby related items, or even gift cards. You could even fire up the grill to prepare a family meal! Regardless of how you celebrate, make sure that you check out some of the items we carry at Mardel. Gifts range from Bibles, books, desk accessories, graphic t-shirts, car accessories, jewelry, and mugs.

 

I Will Leave You With This …

God gave us Ten Commandments in the Bible. The fourth commandment says, “Honor thy father and mother”, and it is found in Exodus 20:12. It is quite simple really. We are to show respect for our parents as both children and adults. Children are to obey their parents, and adults are to see to the care of their parents when they become old.

Think about these questions. What are some of your favorite memories from growing up with your father? Also, how do you celebrate or honor the memory of your father?

 


Lisa Warren

As a Web Merchandiser for Mardel, I write on Gifts, Jewelry, and Apparel for our web site.  I write from the heart of being a wife, mother, grandmother, friend, and Women’s Ministry Coordinator at my church.  More than anything else, I love the Lord.

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